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  • Carrie Specht

Blood Brother: Uplifting Documentary


In case you’re tired of the same old rush of Holiday films and you’re looking for something different to fill your movie going hours, may I suggest a documentary? There are quite a few good ones out at the moment, and playing at many of the major chain theaters. If you throw in Netflix, Red Box and your neighborhood Art Houses you have a lot of variety from which to choose, including a rare and unusually quite, yet moving tale of a young man’s new found life as a volunteer at an Indian orphanage for children with AIDS. Blood Brother is just the kind of story that will help keep the true meaning of the holidays in focus as you hustle and bustle between Black Friday, Cyber Monday and all the big budget block busters extolling the virtues of caring for your fellow man. Blood Brother is the one film that actually, truly demonstrates the true depth of human compassion.

Filmed entirely form the perspective of an observer, Blood Brother is about a young American man named Rocky who took a trip to India as a tourist and ended up changing the course of his life. On a chance day trip away from the big city, Rocky came across a home for children with HIV and created a lasting bond. The story begins when after a brief and disillusioning trip back to the states he decides to return to India and devote his life to the dispossessed children who had so impressed him. The film’s director, Steve Hoover is best friends with Rocky, and in a bit of a state of disbelief ventures to India with him to chronicle his newfound life. The end result is a film that is beautifully crafted and extremely personal.

In the beginning of the film we learn that Rocky grew up without a close-knit family, which makes it all the more remarkable that he finds himself dedicated to the health and wellbeing of orphan children infected with HIV. And despite facing formidable challenges with nothing but his own instincts, Rocky’s playful spirit and determination proves to be unfailing even at the darkest and most depressing moments. Placing adoring faces upon the statistics of the HIV/Aids crisis in India, Blood Brother is a powerful film that beautifully illustrates the impact one person can have on the lives of so many.

Released in October in Los Angeles, the film received a lot of attention earlier in the year when it won both the Grand Jury Prize and Audience Award for Best Documentary at Sundance. Since that time the film has been shown around the country at special one night only engagements in over 50 other cities. These screenings are presented in collaboration with Tugg.com, which is enabling communities nationwide to host screenings of Blood Brother in local theaters, schools and community venues.

Now here’s the really great, Christmas-y part - in support of Rocky and his work all proceeds earned will go directly back to the children and the orphanage featured in the film and to other HIV/AIDS organizations. Think about that. This is one of the rare times that just by buying a ticket to a film, or by organizing a screening you can make a difference. And you can contribute to the holiday spirit at the same time! So, I urge you to do some good for yourself and for others the next time you go to the movies – see something that will restore your faith in mankind and help it at the same time. Not only is it a win-win, it’s a pretty certain way to avoid coal in your stocking, at least for another year.

To find show times in your city visit tugg.com/titles/blood-brother. For additional information about the film or to sign up to host a screening of Blood Brother in your town, please visit www.bloodbrotherfilm.com.

#Documentary #BloodBrother #Orphans #AIDS #Sundance